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    Standards for Sharing Information

    Janglaschu
    By Janglaschu,
    Peter Calver's latest Lost Cousins newsletter had a link to the following guidelines from the National Genealogical Society, which may be of use to beginners (and old hands!)   Genealogical Standards & Guidelines Standards For Sharing Information With Others Recommended by the National Genealogical Society   Conscious of the fact that sharing information or data with others, whether through speech, documents or electronic media, is essential to family history research and that it needs continuing support and encouragement, responsible family historians consistently— • respect the restrictions on sharing information that arise from the rights of another as an author, originator or compiler; as a living private person; or as a party to a mutual agreement. • observe meticulously the legal rights of copyright owners, copying or distributing any part of their works only with their permission, or to the limited extent specifically allowed under the law's "fair use" exceptions. • identify the sources for all ideas, information and data from others, and the form in which they were received, recognizing that the unattributed use of another's intellectual work is plagiarism. • respect the authorship rights of senders of letters, electronic mail and data files, forwarding or disseminating them further only with the sender's permission. • inform people who provide information about their families as to the ways it may be used, observing any conditions they impose and respecting any reservations they may express regarding the use of particular items. • require some evidence of consent before assuming that living people are agreeable to further sharing of information about themselves. • convey personal identifying information about living people—like age, home address, occupation or activities—only in ways that those concerned have expressly agreed to. • recognize that legal rights of privacy may limit the extent to which information from publicly available sources may be further used, disseminated or published. • communicate no information to others that is known to be false, or without making reasonable efforts to determine its truth, particularly information that may be derogatory. • are sensitive to the hurt that revelations of criminal, immoral, bizarre or irresponsible behavior may bring to family members.   ©2000 by National Genealogical Society. Permission is granted to copy or publish this material provided it is reproduced in its entirety, including this notice. http://lostcousins.com/pdf/NGSstandards-sharing.pdf

    Organising your work and other tips

    sftadmin
    By sftadmin,
    Organising your results   Researching your family history can be great fun and can lead to many discoveries about your family and the way they lived. Your research may take a lot of time and money so it is important to keep it organised by:   keeping accurate notes - it's easy to forget sources using loose-leaf binders or keeping images on a potable tablet or notebook, when working away from home, transfer your results to a computer later for back up.     Simple thought for proving your evidence: think PAPER TRAIL. The actual proof of anything is the HARD EVIDENCE not what someone told you. Even then you will find all sorts of problems, conflicting birth years, conflicting names. Again, you need to cross check several pieces before coming to a conclusion.

    Asking questions of family and relatives

    sftadmin
    By sftadmin,
    Most of us remember how, when we were children, our grandparents and other family members used to tell stories about their past and about relatives from long ago. Unfortunately, we were young, and those family stories often held little interest for us. We were too caught up in our own lives to have much concern for the past events of our ancestors’ lives. But years later many of us finally reach an age when all the stories and family history that had seemed so unimportant when we were young start to hold new importance. This new importance often stems from the tragedy of having family members pass away, but sometimes it is simply a function of one’s own gradually- developing desire to know where he or she came from. Ironically, by the time we finally begin to become interested in our family history, many of those older family members who held this information in their memories are no longer with us.   This is why, once you embark on the journey of tracing your heritage, it is urgent that you seek out the older family members who are alive and interview them. If this seems easy, you may be in for a surprise when you first do such an interview.   Why? First of all, you may find that they are uncomfortable doing such an interview--particularly if the person being interviewed is not someone you see often. In addition, it’s often difficult to stay on track. Sometimes, the interview degenerates into small talk, and you find that you’ve come away with very little in the way of family history.   Fortunately, there are some steps you can take to make the interview more successful. You should begin by deciding what the goal of the interview will be. Review any facts you already have, and try to plan the questions you would like to ask beforehand. Take a notebook, and with permission, a tape recorder to record the conversation.   An excellent way of providing a comfortable and neutral environment for the interview is to invite your relative to do the interview over lunch or dinner in a quiet restaurant and explain that you will pay for the meal. This will provide an atmosphere that is relaxed, and show your appreciation for your relative’s time. Best of all, it will provide a basic time schedule for the interview.   The interview should be a comfortable process during which your relative gradually opens up and reveals the information from their memories. Don’t jump in at first with pointed family-related questions. Instead, try opening up by focusing on the person you are interviewing. Ask them about their childhood and try to get them to describe what their lives were like when they were growing up.   Then it becomes natural when they mention their father or mother to ask their names. This is then the opportunity to ask the dates and places where they were born, dates of marriage, and so forth. Keep in mind that you must always be sensitive about deaths of those close to them, but you should politely ask for this information as well, as part of your research.   Listen carefully and record every single thing they tell you. Some things may seem unimportant to you at the time, but as you delve deeper into your research, you will often find that some fact that seemed irrelevant at the time you first heard it can often be the clue that leads you past a sticking point later on, or even opens a new direction for you to pursue.   Whenever you hear a name, write it down, and ask for the full name and the spelling. Many times a name like Jack will be a nickname for John or Bobby for Roberta. Sue may be short for Susan, or Suzanne or SueEllen. Don’t limit your notes to family members only. Friends, neighbours and others who were close to your family members can often remember names, dates, and places that your relative has forgotten.   Always keep in mind that this type of interview is a starting point that will provide background and basic information. Many times, you will discover that the details have been forgotten, dates have gotten confused, and family stories have become subject to exaggeration over a period of time. Don’t regard the information you get in your interview as factual until you have confirmed each detail with other sources   If you make an effort to be prepared, move methodically through the interview process, record the facts, and show consideration and appreciation for your relative’s help with your research, you will not only ensure a successful interview, but you will also leave the door open for follow-up questions as you discover additional facts later.

    Benevolent Institutions (1894)

    sftadmin
    By sftadmin,
    BENEVOLENCE and philanthropy are the true outcome of Christian principle and feeling. This has been practically exemplified in the large number of such institutions in our city, which are wholly supported by voluntary contributions. Our citizens are proverbial for their large-hearted and generous giving whenever a worthy object is put before them. In these pages I can only briefly notice some of them with which I am familiar.   THE ORPHAN HOMES OF SCOTLAND. - This great work of philanthropy, commenced by Mr. William Quarrier in our city a quarter of a century ago, was small in its beginning, but grew year by year. The City Home and Night Refuge in James Morrison Street receive children from two to thirteen years found begging, sleeping out, or destitute; working boys, who have no home, from fourteen to eighteen years; and virtuous young women, out of employment, and no relatives to care for them, from fourteen to thirty years of age. Near Bridge-of-Weir, Renfrewshire, stands his "City of Refuge," charmingly situated. In 1872 the number in the Homes then in existence was 93; in 1882 the number had increased to 459; while in 1893 there were under his care, 1271. The number of young people sent to Canada in 1872 was 64; in 1882, 138; and in 1893, 268. The passage and outfit of each is £10. The cost of maintenance of the homes and emigration expenses from 1872 to 1893 have been £152,763 7s. 5¼d. The expenditure on buildings and ground from 1872 to 1893 has been £133,565 5s. 6¾d. Total amount received since 1872 till 1893 has been £286,328 13s. For maintenance alone it requires fully £50 per day. While other excellent agencies have collectors gathering money to carry on their work, Mr. Quarrier has none. He relies entirely on what the Lord may send through His stewards.   [page 203]   DUNOON CONVALESCENT HOME AND BROOMHILL HOME FOR INCURABLES. - These Institutions owe their genesis to Miss Beatrice Clugston, whose gracious life and noble philanthropic deeds will long be kindly cherished. In a small home at Bothwell she began her Christ-like work in 1865, and in 1869 was inaugurated the well-known Dunoon Home, which since then has frequently been enlarged. These homes are greatly appreciated. They have been a boon and a blessing for the recruiting of many a weary and suffering one. Although Miss Clugston has passed "into the presence of the King," the homes in which she expended time, strength, and money, continue to be liberally supported by the public.   EAST-PARK HOME FOR INFIRM CHILDREN. - This beneficent institution for the relief of incurable and infirm children is situated in the north-west district of the city. With recent extensions ample accommodation is provided for the little sufferers. By the unwearied zeal of Mr. William Mitchell, of School Board fame, and the hearty co-operation of the ladies and gentlemen associated with him, many patients have had their bodily ailments greatly alleviated, and their minds instructed.   THE CHARITY ORGANISATION SOCIETY was instituted in May, 1874. The objects which this institution chiefly desires to attain are the following: The repression of indiscriminate and foolish almsgiving and mendicity; the exposure of imposition which preys on the public; the organisation of charitable relief, and its effective administration; the prevention of overlapping in charitable and benevolent effort, and consequent waste of money and power; the amelioration, through suitable agencies, of the condition of all poor persons; the discovery of the deserving poor, and relief according to their needs; and the collection by accredited officials, or the receiving by schedule of subscriptions of all bona fide charitable and benevolent institutions.   [page 204]   The methods of attaining these objects are various, and among the ways and means used by the Society are: Investigating agents for discovering facts; the labour yard for testing willingness to work, and for providing subsistence wages in return for work done; tickets for food and lodging; grants, loans, fares, clothing, medical aid, etc.; registry for employment, or labour bureau; private register of cases to afford information and prevent imposition; confidential reports for subscribers and others legitimately interested; friendly visitors to deal with cases beyond the immediate reach of the Society; and co-operation with the sheriffs, the magistrates, the parochial boards, the charities, and the churches of Glasgow.   THE GLASGOW BENEVOLENT SOCIETY in 1832 began its work. For over sixty years it has quietly been rendering help to the deserving poor by giving them bread and coals. Missionaries and Bible-women are the chief agents in distributing to the needy its gifts of kindness.   THE SCOTTISH NATIONAL SOCIETY FOR THE PREVENTION OF CRUELTY TO CHILDREN. - This Society began its humane work in Glasgow in 1844. Its reports from year to year unfold the beneficent work it is accomplishing. For 1892 the cases involved the welfare of 1,863 children.   THE GLASGOW DAY-NURSERIES ASSOCIATION. - The objects of this Association are the establishing, support, and extension in suitable localities in Glasgow and suburbs of day-nurseries for children of the working-classes, where the parents require to work outside their homes to earn a living. It has already six district nurseries scattered over the city.   [page 205]   THE GLASGOW EAR HOSPITAL was founded in 1872. Its objects are the treatment of poor persons suffering from ear diseases or deafness. In 1891-2 no less than 6,175 out-door and fifty-one in-door patients were treated by it.   THE HOUSES OF SHELTER AND MISSION SHELTER. - These institutions are carrying on most humane work among females liberated from prison who are desirous to reform and to support themselves by honest industry.   THE GLASGOW CONVALESCENT HOME, LENZIE, was established in 1866. It has accommodation for seventy-five patients, of whom thirty are taken from the Glasgow Royal Infirmary, ten from the Western Infirmary, and thirty-five from the general public resident in Glasgow and the neighbourhood. The ordinary expenditure is a little over £2,000 a-year. There are two visiting medical officers.   GLASGOW ROYAL HOSPITAL FOR SICK CHILDREN. - The objects of this institution are the medical and surgical treatment of poor children suffering from non-infectious diseases or accidents. This hospital has seventy beds. Since its opening to 31st December, 1892, there have been 4,641 children in its wards.   NIGHT ASYLUM FOR THE HOUSELESS. - In 1838 this institution was established to provide a night's shelter and a comfortable meal to houseless persons, who, but for it, would be left exposed in the streets, lanes, or closes of the city, In 1891 there were 43,821 admissions: average nightly of 120.   CITY OF GLASGOW NATIVE BENEVOLENT ASSOCIATION was founded by the late James Lumsden, Esq., in June, 1844. Its object is to afford assistance to relatives and widows and families of natives of the city, who formerly were in good circumstances, but by reverse of fortune or otherwise are in need of assistance.   [page 206]   THE GLASGOW SICK POOR AND PRIVATE NURSING ASSOCIATION. - This institution, founded by the late Mrs. Higginbotham, in 1875, maintains a staff of highly qualified medical, surgical, fever, and midwifery nurses for nursing patients. In 1892-3 the number of cases treated was 1,555. It has been a great benefit to the suffering poor.   THE GLASGOW INSTITUTION FOR ORPHAN AND DESTITUTE GIRLS was established in 1826. It provides a home for poor girls, having accommodation for sixty. The younger girls are sent to the Board Schools for education, while the older get a practical training for domestic service.   POOR CHILDREN'S DINNER TABLE. - Established in 1869. Does most beneficent work. It has tables in thirteen different districts of the city, and gives about 2,400 dinners daily.   THE SAILORS' ORPHAN SOCIETY OF SCOTLAND - founded in 1889 to feed, clothe, educate, or otherwise provide for the orphan or fatherless children of seafaring men who have been left in destitute circumstances - has over 350 children under its care. Its income for year ending March, 1893, was £9,048.   THE WIDOWS' FRIEND SOCIETY relieves destitute Christian widows in Glasgow. It is supported by voluntary contributions. Nearly 800 widows are assisted annually.   BARONY OF GORBALS BENEVOLENT SOCIETY was instituted in 1806. Since its formation its pecuniary aid to old inhabitants of that district has been great, and fraught with much good to the recipients. The late Bailies Gourlay and Craig did much to foster and develop the usefulness of the Society.   [page 207]   GLASGOW TRAINING HOME FOR NURSES is located in Renfrew Street. Its objects are to train, or cause to be trained, women of high character for the work of nursing the sick. While it sends out nurses to families, it has accommodation for private patients.   MAGDALENE INSTITUTION. - The Magdalene Asylum, instituted in 1815, was merged in this institution in 1867. Its objects are the repression of vice and the reformation of penitent women, and the rescue and protection of young women who may be in imminent danger of being led astray.   MISSION TO THE DEAF AND DUMB. - Instituted 1822. It seeks out and attends to the general wants of those so afflicted, and strives to minister to their temporal and spiritual needs. There are 650 deaf mutes under the care of the mission, some of whom are blind as well. Religious services in the silent language are regularly conducted, while home visitation is systematically carried on.   ASYLUM FOR THE BLIND. - For sixty-five years this charity has given education and industrial training to the juvenile blind, and provided a home for poor and destitute blind children and aged women. It also teaches trades, and provides employment for adult blind men and women.   DISCHARGED PRISONERS' AID SOCIETY. - This Society was instituted in 1856, its object being to befriend and reclaim discharged prisoners and convicts, by helping them to find steady work, or assist those who wish to return to friends at a distance.   extract from ''glimpses of old glasgow''

    Just starting out on your research?

    sftadmin
    By sftadmin,
    If you're just starting out in your hunt for your ancestors, please take a look at the link below, this is a very useful guide/reminder.     http://www.esatclear.ie/~brib/wheredo.htm

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